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Smart Home hardware automation growth to top 1000% by 2020

Smart Home hardware automation growth to top 1000% by 2020

Smart Home hardware automation growth to top 1000% by 2020

As the recent announcement that London’s Smart Home World event is moving to The Crystal indicates, it looks like the smart home is going to be a big theme in 2016.

And now new data from Juniper Research has found that home automation hardware, sold as standalone units rather than as part of a subscription package, will exceed 300 million in 2020. This represents growth of over 1000% from an estimated installed base of 28 million units in 2015.

The new research, Smart Home Ecosystems & the Internet of Things: Strategies & Forecasts 2015-2020, found that early ‘piecemeal’ hardware efforts simply created isolated smart automation units. Open platform efforts, such as those championed by SmartThings and Wink have nevertheless driven more cohesive ecosystems. Meanwhile Deutsche Telekom’s open platform, Qivicon, demonstrates a shift in attitude even for incumbent service providers, who traditionally prefer total control over their services.

“There’s light at the end of the tunnel” notes research author Steffen Sorrell. “Open approaches certainly help move the connected home towards a smarter one. However, the consumer still needs to be convinced: that will be the job of retail to solve, and that’s a question of educating both employee and consumer.”

Roundtable: How can we put the consumer at the heart of the IoT?

 

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