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Parks Associates research: TV apps on the up

New research from Parks Associates shows mobile consumption of video is driving usage of TV apps, with 55% of U.S. smartphone owners and 61% of tablet owners using a TV-related app at least once a month. The research firm will address the growing influence of the app ecosystem at the 18th-annual CONNECTIONS: The Premier Connected Home Conference, May 13-15, 2014, in San Francisco, with keynotes from ARRIS, AT&T, iControl Networks, and Lowe’s.

“TV app usage is altering the use cases for multiple connected devices; currently 57% of connected game console owners are using the device to watch TV shows,” said Stuart Sikes, President, Parks Associates.  ”We are also seeing new revenue opportunities emerge through in-app solutions in the smart home and Internet of Things. In-app solutions will be a large focus of our 2014 CONNECTIONS Conference, where our analysts and industry leaders will address the changes surrounding the connected home and implications for consumers and businesses.”

Additional TV apps research from Parks Associates shows:

  • Over 70% of TV-app users are satisfied with the TV show or network apps they use.
  • The number of global TV app users on smartphones will reach 1.29 billion by 2018.
  • Over 23% of U.S. smartphone owners 18-34 have used a TV app on their smartphone to schedule a DVR recording. Over 22% have used an app that transforms their smartphone into a remote control for their TV or set-top box.

 

 

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