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Telstra break ground with commerical LTE broadcast

Australia’s leading telecommunications provider, Telstra, today announced that it has completed the world’s first LTE Broadcast session on a commercial LTE network. Ericsson’s LTE Broadcast Solution was successfully activated and tested on Telstra’s live network with the transmission of concurrent video feeds and large files to enabled devices.

During the demonstration, the devices received different video feeds, including a sports match replay, sporting network news, horse racing coverage and news. Additionally, the devices received a large file using the single LTE Broadcast channel.

“The trial is an important step in testing this technology to see how it provides network efficiencies while providing consumers the content they want in a high-quality experience,” says Mike Wright, Telstra Executive Director, Networks. “Our goal is to ensure consumers can get the content they are looking for easily and to explore the wider benefits that might be obtained using broadcasting technology.”

Unique content can be delivered concurrently to a large number of subscribers, for example multiple video feeds with different angles for close-up views or replays during live sporting events. Other uses include sending updates and content to digital signage or billboards.

Consumers can also enjoy pre-loaded updates of things like software or the morning paper, so they don’t need to wait for downloads in high-traffic situations.

 

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