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Colba.Net Telecom expands Quebeçoise IPTV footprint

More communities in the French-speaking Canadian province of Quebec will be getting IPTV services following a decision by local telco Colba.Net Telecom to expand its IPTV footprint there.

This follows the recent approval by the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) of the telco’s application for a broadcasting regional licence to serve the following communities in Quebec: Montreal, Drummondville, Trois-Rivières, Gatineau, Sherbrooke, Quebec and in the surrounding areas of Quebec.

Colba.Net launched its IPTV service in December 2011 on the Island of Montreal, offering a number of high-definition channels and some popular US channels, as well as access to the content streaming websites Netflix, AppleTV and TOUT.TV.

The company will face a tough competitor however in Bell Canada, which has already launched its IPTV service ‘Fibe TV’ in Montreal, delivered over the telco’s fibre-based network and offering over 100 high-definition channels, more than 70 international channels and over 20 thematic packages, as well as interactive features and whole home PVR capabilities.

Fibe TV is expected to be available to 5mn Canadian households by the end of 2015, whereupon Bell expects to become Canada’s largest TV provider, and to that end plans to invest billions of dollars in its fibre, satellite and wireless broadband networks in order to deliver the most extensive TV services possible.

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